The London College

Test Page

Through the automatic emailer

If you know your username or the email account in your profile, you can use the “lost password” feature of WordPress.

  • Go to your WordPress Login page (something like http://yoursite.com/wordpress/wp-login.php)
  • Click on the Lost your password? link
  • You will be taken to a page to put in some details. Enter your username or the email address on file for that account.
  • Wait happily as your new password is emailed to you.
  • Once you get your new password, login and change it to something you can remember on your profile page.

Through MySQL/MariaDB Command Line

  1. Get an MD5 hash of your password.
    • Visit md5 Hash Generator, or…
    • Create a key with Python. or…
    • On Unix/Linux:
      1. Create file wp.txt with the new password in it (and *nothing* else)
      2. tr -d '\r\n' < wp.txt | md5sum | tr -d ' -'
      3. rm wp.txt
    • On Mac OS X:
      1. Create file wp.txt with the new password in it (and *nothing* else), then enter either of the lines below
      2. md5 -q ./wp.txt; rm ./wp.txt (If you want the MD5 hash printed out)
      3. md5 -q ./wp.txt | pbcopy; rm ./wp.txt (If you want the MD5 hash copied to the clipboard)
  2. mysql -u root -p” (log in to MySQL/MariaDB)
  3. enter your mysql password
  4. use (name-of-database)” (select WordPress database)
  5. show tables;” (you’re looking for a table name with “users” at the end)
  6. SELECT ID, user_login, user_pass FROM (name-of-table-you-found);” (this gives you an idea of what’s going on inside)
  7. UPDATE (name-of-table-you-found) SET user_pass="(MD5-string-you-made)" WHERE ID = (id#-of-account-you-are-reseting-password-for);” (actually changes the password)
  8. SELECT ID, user_login, user_pass FROM (name-of-table-you-found);” (confirm that it was changed)
  9. (type Control-D, to exit mysql client)

Note if you have a recent version of MySQL (version 5.x?) or any version of MariaDB, you can have MySQL/MariaDB compute the MD5 hash for you.

  1. Skip step 1. above.
  2. Do the following for step 7. instead.
    • UPDATE (name-of-table-you-found) SET user_pass = MD5('(new-password)') WHERE ID = (id#-of-account-you-are-reseting-password-for);” (actually changes the password)

Note that even if the passwords are salted, meaning they look like $P$BLDJMdyBwegaCLE0GeDiGtC/mqXLzB0, you can still replace the password with an MD5 hash, and WordPress will let you log in.